Somebody Up There Likes Me

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Paul Newman rose to stardom for his portrayal of the real-life Rocky Graziano, a man who fought his way up from a life of crime to become Middleweight Champion of the World. "World's Leading Boxers Train Here Daily" says a sign outside Stillman's Gym. read more
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Paul Newman rose to stardom for his portrayal of the real-life Rocky Graziano, a man who fought his way up from a life of crime to become Middleweight Champion of the World. "World's Leading Boxers Train Here Daily" says a sign outside Stillman's Gym. Thomas Rocco Barbella isn't a boxer. He's just a scrappy, desperate youth who needs dough. So he enters the gym, gives himself the made-up name of Rocky Graziano, signs on to spar for $10 and flattens a top light-heavyweight.The name sticks. So does the impact of this inspiring tale about Graziano's rise from poverty and rage to the middleweight title. In his second film, Paul Newman plays the ring king, preparing for the role in part by meeting with Graziano to study his speech and ways. Robert Wise, who earlier captured the fight game in The Set-Up, directs this double Academy Award®-winner* with K.O. force. Unbilled Steve McQueen and Robert Loggia add to the film's many pleasures. Pull up a ringside seat. This is the stuff of champions.

Original Release

07/03/1956

Links

Cast

Directors

Robert Wise

Writers

Ernest Lehman, Rocky Graziano, Rowland Barber

Cast

Eileen Heckart Ma Barbella
Everett Sloane Irving Cohen
Paul Newman Rocky
Pier Angeli Norma
Sal Mineo Romolo
Steve McQueen Fidel
Harold J. Stone Nick Barbella
Arch Johnson Heldon
Joseph Buloff Benny
Sammy White Whitey Bimstein
Robert P. Lieb District Attorney Hogan (as Robert Lieb)
Theodore Newton Athletic Commissioner Edward Eagan
Stanley Adams Romolo's Attorney (uncredited)
Fred Aldrich Ringside Photographer - Zale Fight (uncredited)
Leon Alton Fight Spectator (uncredited)
William Boyett Military Policeman Escort at Fight (uncredited)
Bart Braverman Boy (uncredited)
John Breen Hearing Specatator (uncredited)
Frank Campanella Detective (uncredited)
Walter Cartier Polack (uncredited)

Producers

Editors

Albert Akst

1957 Oscar Best Cinematography, Black-and-White Won
1957 Oscar Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White Won
1957 Oscar Best Film Editing Nominated
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